Tag Archives: retail do and don’ts

New survey by Gekko reveals retail staff are more influential than celebrities and vloggers

Gekko - Google Retail blog image

The results from a recent survey published today by field marketing agency Gekko entitled ‘Shopper Influencers’ reveals that the bricks and mortar retail environment continues to play a significant role in influencing shoppers purchasing decisions across both general and high value goods. The survey by OnePoll was conducted among 2000 UK consumers between 18 and 55+.

Even among today’s tech savvy 18 to 24 years old’s more than 40% prefer to head in-store to see, touch and experience a product before buying, rising to 58% for the over 55’s. Most surprising is that 38% of 18 to 24 year old’s want a personal service and recommendation from in-store staff, the highest among all of the age categories. Only a small proportion of 18 to 24 year old shoppers are swayed by celebrity endorsement (18%) or the opinion of vlogger’s and bloggers (28%).

The influence of friends (70%) and online reviews (71%) among this age group is significantly higher in making product purchase decisions and this is consistent across all age groups. And when it comes to high value items such as TV’s, home appliances and luxury items, the trend continues with online reviews, personal recommendation and the in-store experience rating as the most important influences across all age categories.

When it comes to looking at the key influencers across product sectors there are some notable trends: 

  • Within the tech sector, online reviews from other people are still heavily relied upon (38%) among 18 to 24 year olds but interestingly this is also the case for all age groups with (35%) for over 55’s.
  • Similar to tech, for home appliances, user reviews rate highly across all groups (32%) 18 to 24 year olds, rising up to (46%) among 45 to 54s.
  • For beauty and fashion, reviews from other people score highly across all age groups but in this sector, unlike the others, the influence of bloggers and vloggers is much more highly rated, although only among the younger 18-24 generation (32%) for beauty and (23%) for fashion.

When asked what advertising has influenced a considered purchase none of the mainstream advertising channels were cited as influential: just 7.5% for TV, 8.7% for website, 4.6% for social media, 3% for billboard and 2% for newspaper and print. Advertising in-situ within the retail environment however was rated the key influencing factor at 19%.

Daniel Todaro, Managing Director of Gekko, said: “According to the ONS, while online sales continue to rise, e-commerce as a percentage of total retail sales July to August 2017 was still only 16.4%.  The findings of this study show that the shop floor is clearly still winning in considered purchases, therefore marketers need to invest in making the experience as good as it can be. When a shopper is ready to make a purchase they will look for advice and guidance from people who have experience of using the product be that friends, family, other users or experts in-store. Consumers today are much more savvy and recognise that celebrities and vloggers have been paid for their endorsement, while time and money spent working with staff on the shop floor will in fact pay for itself through category development and increased sales at a higher average sales price, making your marketing work harder.”

Read the article here

Source: Gekko

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Don’t be a retail Dinosaur

Gekko Field Marketing - Retail Dinosaur

DON’T BE A RETAIL DINOSAUR

The best retailers are those that can adapt – that may include looking at rentals or creating a smart home experience in-store to appeal to a new generation of buyers, advises Gekko managing director Daniel Todaro

Having sat on the ERT Awards judging panel, selecting retailers who are the best in their chosen specialism has highlighted some high-flyers, but we all know that there are some real dinosaurs out there that need to change in order to survive.

Retail is one of the most dynamic of industries. At its best, it quietly adapts to the needs of shoppers to increase dwell time, convenience and average basket value. Multiple retailers follow this religiously to increase sales and margins – an approach independents should learn from.

With home ownership increasingly more difficult to achieve, ‘generation rent’ is becoming a significant demographic. This model may not appeal to all retailers, but as a generational change, for many it’s unthinkable to buy outright, repair or move MDAs and CE items. Offering some form of rental package is another consumer-driven solution that allows a retailer to drive sales.

Smart home

With the growth of various new categories, retailers have numerous opportunities – and the greatest of all is the smart home. This will influence all product areas over the next five years.

At the end of 2016, there were 8.5 million smart homes in Europe and the market is forecast to grow by 57 per cent a year to reach 80.6m by 2021. This equates to 36 per cent of all European households owning a smart-home product.

Although shoppers are beginning to see the benefits, it’s clear that they aren’t simply looking for a like-for-like replacement. The key is to display products in a connected manner as a consumer would do in their own home.

In emerging categories, such as smart speakers, the global market is expected to grow annually by 43.7 per cent up to 2022. Sales of 4K UHD TVs are set to grow by 38 per cent in 2017 and will account for more than a third of the worldwide TV market.

And with a quarter of consumers citing a ‘lack of knowledge’ as a reason for not purchasing a smart-home product, and a further 21 per cent worried about security, independents have an opportunity to showcase the technology and alleviate these concerns. If shoppers can see how these products will work in their home, it is much more likely to lead to a sale.

It’s up to retailers to create this environment. Make sure your store’s wi-fi will support multiple devices. Set up some wireless speakers so that shoppers can play songs via Bluetooth using their app. Most importantly, ensure that your staff are trained on each product.

Brands can only help so far in supporting you with training and point-of-sale to create in-store theatre – the rest is up to you.

Taking an omni-channel approach will also mean that although a customer may not leave with their desired purchase that day, they could order and collect next day, or have it installed – for a fee.

Manufacturers can help with creating experience zones in-store. While you are tied into that brand, it offers an opportunity to change perceptions and speak to a new audience.

The most successful retailers adapt to the needs of consumers, which are driven by trends. Don’t rely on brands and take control of your own destiny.

Dos and don’ts to increase sales

Take control of your destiny and give customers the best experience in-store so that they buy not just once, but again and again.

Here are my top 10 dos and don’ts…

DO use your window displays to attract customers.

DON’T leave your displays bland, old or irrelevant to what you sell.

DO echo a high-profile advertising campaign outdoor poster site near your store.

DON’T leave old p-o-s or product out for too long.

DO ensure your customer is greeted.

DON’T leave your customer to browse with no contact being made.

DO merchandise the store so it is uncluttered.

DON’T mix up categories even if space is limited. Microwaves don’t belong with laundry.

DO make ticketing accurate and visible

DON’T make the customer ask you the price or feel you are pressurising them to talk to you.

DO ask your customer questions to make relevant recommendations.

DON’T bulldoze your customer because you know best.

DO listen to your customer to meet their needs and budget.

DON’T sell them something they don’t need. Buyer’s remorse will increase returns and lose you a customer for life.

DO sell a backup item or offer an order service if it’s out of stock.

DON’T lose the sale to a competitor because you don’t have the product.

DO make a distress purchase a pleasure.

DON’T make it harder than it needs to be.

DO offer an after-sales service and make them remember you for positive reasons.

DON’T treat the customer with contempt – today’s small purchase could be tomorrow’s bigger one

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